Working with Thoughts

Working with Thoughts

For the purpose of meditation, nothing is particularly worth thinking about: not our childhood, not our relationships, not the great novel we always wanted to write. This does not mean that thoughts will not come. In fact, they may come with tremendous frequency. We do not need to fight with them or struggle against them or judge them. Rather, we can simply choose not to follow the thoughts once they have arisen. The quicker we notice that we are thinking, the quicker we can see thought’s empty nature.
Sharon Salzberg and Joseph Goldstein,

Having said that – I keep going back to anticipatory thoughts about the initial meeting this evening; the start of another 8 week mindfulness course – thinking about it brings about excitement, motivation, enthusiasm – and a sense of privilege and appreciation at finding myself in a position to be offering this (and at the same time as being in the middle of facilitating a two weekend version in London)
But all this thinking – and the feelings it brings about – is not “for the purpose of meditation”
– it serves a different purpose: to deliver me in the best possible state of mind to deliver the course. Creative thinking, I trust!